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Restoring Saws, Saw Tools, and Other Equipment


 
  Saw Handle Horn Repair by Daryl Weir 1 of 3  

 

 

I always start by looking at the broken area and decide on how I want to make the initial cut to remove the damaged area.

I've done this quite a few times but decided to take a few pictures this time on the process I go through to replace a horn. I wished I'd start taken pictures before I partially cut the top horn off.

This one was pretty easy to decide on a cut as the break on the end of the top horn wasn't too bad. I wanted to keep all the original wheat carving intact so I angled the cut upward slightly. This makes it possible to use a small block plane to true up the cut edge. Sometimes, if the cut has to come in lower, a chisel with wood guides on each side of the handle are used to true up the cut edge.

I added a piece of apple from an old handle. I'm lucky to have a box full of old apple from donor handles that were broken beyond repair. I'd rather use the old apple but sometimes that isn't possible and I have to use new.

Here's the part of the horn that was damaged. The damage wasn't too bad but this handle deserved to be fixed as the rest was in good shape. It's a No.12 which doesn't hurt either.

I'm fortunate to have enough examples of saws that I can use them as a tracing pattern.

I try to find a chunk that's just a little thicker than the handle I'm working on. Again the edge was planed with a block plane to make a nice glue joint.

The handle had been soaked in my bucket of lacquer thinner, then scrubbed with scotchbrite and a tooth brush. I won't sand except for around the repair area. My preference is not to strip the handle at all but sometimes I feel it's necessary.

I used Franklin's Titebond to glue the joint up and a rubber band for a little pressure.

Darker piece of apple looks a little strange right now doesn't it...


 
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